Archive for the ‘ Learning to fly ’ Category

Go professional GPC Inspire 1 Travel Mode Case Review

Go Professional GPC-INSPIRE-1T Travel Mode Case

 gpc case

Type: Travel Mode
Weight: 26.9 lb / 12.2 kg
Ext Dimensions: 31.5 x 20.8 x 12.5″ / 80.1 x 52.9 x 31.8 cm
Price: $429 from B&H Photo

The Go Professional Inspire 1 travel mode case features a water-jet cut custom foam interior and a water-tight and impact resistant outer shell. In addition to the aircraft the case will hold two transmitters (radio controllers), six flight batteries and one charger, two monitors with a screen up to 10″, and features three cavities for miscellaneous items such as spare props, cables, and other items.

inspire-1-case-reviews - 1

Compared to the standard Inspire 1 case and the HPRC 2730 this one is a bit of monster. Although not quite as tall as the HPRC it’s just as deep and 7 inches wider. It also weighs in at a whopping 12.2KG (26.9 lb)

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 1 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 11 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 5

The construction of the Go Professional (GPC) case is again a very rugged shell with latches and bracing. This style of case has stood the test of time and looking at the GPC case I have no reason to think this will fare any worse. The case features a long handle on the front, given the size this may prove useful for two handed lifts.

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 6 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 10 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 11

The latches on the GPC case use a spring loaded lever mechanism whereby you just push them down in one movement to close them but in order to release them a small button must be pushed in on the back of the lever. The latches are protected by bracings running the length of the latch. The case features three latches on the front and one each side.

Two locking points are included on the case and these feature a metal reinforcement.

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 12 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 3 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 7

The three hinges look substantial and include heavy duty bracing for protection and strength. The case also includes a pressure equalisation valve.

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 7 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 8 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 16

The case is fitted with four inline skate type wheels, these make for a really smooth ride and work well on many surfaces. It may seem like a small thing but having this type of wheel can do a lot to protect your gear from unwanted vibrations and jolts.

     inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 14          inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 13             inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 15

Unfortunately the pull out handle on the case does require two handed operation but once extended it seems to work well.

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 19 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 21 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 20

Looking inside the case reveals the nicely finished water cut foam finished with a blue surface layer. Unlike the HPRC case this one is all one piece and finishes flush with the foam in the lid to stop any items coming in to contact with each other.

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 28 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 26 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 24

While the controllers and batteries do fit in to the slots provided I would have liked to have seen these designed to grip the items a little more. Neither the controllers or the batteries fit snuggly in to the provided spaces and there’s room for them to wobble around. The battery slots especially could have been designed better, the slots don’t grip the batteries at all and they sit proud on the foam. Given that the foam in the lid will be pressing against the power buttons on the batteries I wonder if there’s a chance they could be activated in the case.

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 29 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 30 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 27

The camera case fit’s nicely and there’s plenty of room for iPads, chargers and other accessories on the right side of the case. It’s nice that the iPads are well protected in this case and not susceptible to damage from other items.

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 22 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 35 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 31

The Inspire itself fits nicely in to the case and it’s nice to see that it sinks down low enough inside the foam. Each motor boom slot on the sides has a foam block position at the bottom to support each boom. Although the arms themselves are not supported this looks to offer plenty of support for the Inspire.

inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 32 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 34 inspire-1-case-review-go-professional-travel-mode - 36

Conclusion

While being on the large side I’d definitely trust The Go Professional travel mode case to protect my Inspire to baggage handlers. The case itself is very heavy at 12KG but it’s contents are relatively lightweight and fully packed the case should still be less than 20KG which is both manageable and meets most airlines weight limits for hold luggage.

While great for travel, the case is probably a bit big and heavy for day to day use, you certainly wouldn’t want to have to carry it very far! I do think the batteries could have been handled better but as a protective case it performs very well indeed.

Find out more about the GPC Travel Mode case at B&H Photo

Click here for more Inspire 1 Case Reviews.
Inspire 1 Cases – Overview

 

dji-phantom-range-banner

Inspire 1 ND filters Part 2 – Renaat filters

Since posting my review of the Polar Pro filters the DJI Inspire 1 I’ve purchased another set from a guy named Renaat in China. I read about his filters set on the InspirePilots forum, for more information he can be contacted via email at ceulenaere@gmail.com

product shots - 1

I paid a total of $84 including delivery for a set of four filters from Renaat including ND8, ND16, ND32 & ND64. The filters were delivered in 2 days using DHL so they are extremely good value.

product shots - 2

 

Read more

Inspire 1 ND Filters – DJI & Polar Pro reviews

The DJI Inspire 1’s camera seems to do a really good job, I’d say it’s certainly on par with the results from my GoPro Hero 4. One thing that soon becomes apparent though is that much like shooting with the GoPro obtaining correct exposure for video involves a lot of compromise with regards to shutter speed.

Inspire_Filter_Tests_DJI_ND - 2

Unlike larger lenses these tiny devices don’t offer anything in the way of aperture control so the only way to reduce exposure in camera (once ISO is at 100) is by increasing the shutter speed. The general rule of thumb for video and film is that each frame of the video is exposed for half of the time it’s available. So for instance if shooting at 25p (25 frames a second) the shutter speed would normally to half that at 1/50th of a second.

It gets confusing when talking about shutter speeds because shorter amounts of time have larger numbers, 1/100th of a second for example is twice as long as 1/200th of a second. The easiest way to remember when talking shutter speeds is that the ideal shutter speed number is double the frame rate, so at 24p the ideal shutter speed is 1/48th of a second, and at 30p it’s 1/60th of a second.

Read more

Learning to fly – First Shots

In the week since my first test flight with the Inspire 1 I’ve been out flying it nearly every day, it’s almost becoming an obsession!  As somebody who enjoys capturing images from the world around me I’ve found that suddenly having this amazing new perspective on life has reignited a passion for capturing images that I haven’t felt in ages. Here’s a few of my first attempts at filming from the Inspire.

While I’m finding it very tempting to start being more daring with my shots I’m forcing myself to take things slowly and really think about every movement of the Inspire. It would be all too easy at this stage to let creativity take over and get the camera in to more interesting positions but for now I’m leaving myself plenty of room and remembering that it’s early days in the development of my flying skills.

Read more

Learning to fly – First flight

With the Inspire one updated to the latest firmware it was time to take it out for it’s first flight. There are however some really important things to consider before doing so and just to clarify those I’m going to run through them.

Know how to fly

This seems a bit obvious but it would be all too easy to get to this stage and think you can just figure out the flying part as you go, I highly advise against that as any mistakes are likely to be very costly indeed. Having not owned a drone before I spent a lot of time using simulators, theres an app for IOS called Quadcopter FX Simulator which I used a lot in the weeks before getting the Inspire. Although using the app is a long way from handling an actual remote control unit it does give you a really good understanding of how to control a quad. If you enable Smart Control and Pos Hold it’s closer to working with a DJI device in GPS mode as when you let go of the controls the aircraft will stay in place.

screen520x924

Using the app you can practise things like flying the quad around an object whilst maintaining camera position, it also has FPV and stabilised Gimbal views so you really can get a feel for basic operation. Of course using an iPhone screen to make control inputs is far from ideal and is actually a lot harder then using the joysticks on an actual controller but it definitely helps you to form some muscle memory and start making inputs using the correct thumb.

Read more