Posts Tagged ‘ Canon C300

Talking FCPX on the FCP Grill Podcast

fcpg

I recently had the pleasure of talking to Chris Fenwick from the FCP Grill podcast about why I chose to move from Premiere Pro over to FCPX.  I always enjoy listening to Chris’ podcasts so it was really tough remembering that I needed to talk back to him from time to time!

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Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 56:09 — 26.8MB)

If you don’t already listen to Chris’ podcasts then check them out at the digitalCINEMAcafe website. Chris also runs a great blog himself where he posts many a useful tutorial and other film / editing related info.

Reviewed: Shoot35 CINEfocus r3

The Shoot35 CINEfocus r3 is the latest incarnation of Shoot35’s follow focus offerings. 

I reviewed the original (r1) CINEfocus back in 2009 and although that version has worked really well over it’s lifetime the latest incarnation is a totally new design with a host of features that promise to make it more precise, more flexible and easier to use.  So lets start by opening the box and seeing what goodies are waiting inside…

 
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Canon EOS C300 Firmware 1.1.1.1.00

Canon have just announced the release of firmware version 1.1.1.1.00 for the EOS C300.

EOS_C300_EF_Mount_body_CN-E85mm_T1.3_LF_Rear_3_4_Prov

Firmware Version 1.1.1.1.00 incorporates all the functions and modifications listed below:

EOS C300 Cinema EOS Camera & EOS C300 PL Cinema EOS Camera
1. Fixes a phenomenon where the previous Firmware Version 1.1.0.1.00 offered incorrect color balance.
2. Ability to move the magnification viewing area around the LCD using the MAGN Function.
3. Support for a 1440×1080/35Mbps recording mode.
4. ISO up to 80,000 has been added.
5. Added functionality to support the optional Canon GPS Receiver GP-E1.
6. A Key Lock menu setting has been added which now makes it possible to lock all operations, including the START/STOP button.
7. Using the optional Canon WFT-E6 Wireless File Transmitter, the camera’s remote-control application allows two users to access the same unit via a Wi-Fi® link providing simultaneous camera operation and control and metadata input simultaneously.
8. [Lens Exchange] and [ND+/ND-] have been added as functions that can be allocated to any assignable button.
9. A new Wide DR Gamma setting provides an expanded dynamic range of 800%.
10. Flicker Reduction has been improved.

EOS C300 Cinema EOS Camera only
11. Provides Push Auto Iris and One-Shot AF operation.
12. A new AE Shift function and the selection of various light-metering modes are now available when used with some Canon Cinema lenses (EF mount) and Canon EF Lenses.
13. Ability to assign the two control dials to operate either Iris or ISO sensitivity independently.
14. Peripheral Illumination Correction Data has been added for seven (7) Canon Cinema lenses (EF mount) and fifteen (15) Canon EF Lenses.
15. A function has been added to enable continuous focus and iris setting on a subject in the middle of the screen when one of the two EF STM lenses** is attached.
**[EF-S18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM], [EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM].

 

There’s certainly some useful additions in there, my favourite has to be the ability to move the magnification viewing area around in the LCD, a small thing that will make life a lot easier.  Just as a note, the lens needs to be switched to manual focus otherwise the viewing area remains locked to the centre.

Also features like one shot AF and Iris could be useful at times although it has to be said that I rarely use those on the C100 which has had them since launch.

It’s great that the C300 now also gets the [Wide Dynamic Range] picture profile, I really like that profile on the C100 but have rarely used it because I wanted both the C100 and C300 to produce similar results. I’ll do some testing over the next day or so to see how they match up.

Also of interest is the new [Lens Exchange] function. The C300 has been reported to be prone to failure when some lenses are removed while the camera is powered up so I always power mine down when swapping glass. By pressing the assigned [Lens Exchange] button for 1 second the C300 will switch to a mode that still allows lenses to be swapped without fear of damage because power is removed from the lens contacts. The main benefits of using the lens exchange feature over switching the camera off are that time code will continue to run and it’s also much faster. There’s almost no delay either going in to Lens Exchange mode and or coming out of it.

Here’s more detail from the updated C300 manual.

lens_exchange

 

 

Tell Me Whom You Haunt

This was another in a series of interviews shot at the Blain Southern gallery in Hanover Square, London.  This was my first shoot with the Kessler  Pocket Jib traveller and it was quite a challenging day where I really felt that my kit was fighting me instead of working with me. I travel to these shoots on the train so the amount of kit I can take with me is limited. That day in particular the production company asked if I could bring along a travel dolly rather than the Kessler Stealth Slider as the subject matter required larger camera runs.

I have one of those Hague dolly’s that runs on plastic tubing so I took that with me and ended up battling with it all day. I’ve used that dolly in the past and with enough time and a few extra hands it can produce good results, but in an environment where time is of the essence and your working with minimal help it’s a challenging thing to use. I’d much rather take along my Kessler Stealth slider which produces much steadier results with less effort, although over shorter distances. As it turned out the slider would have been much better suited to the subject matter that day anyway.

I think the final results look really nice so well done Archie Campbell for finding the good shots. It does show that the little Pocket Jib Traveller can deliver the goods if you’re careful enough with it, just don’t try and run it on a travel dolly at the same time!

Bill Viola

I had the great pleasure of shooting an Interview with Bill Viola at the Blain Southern gallery in London earlier in the year and found him to be a very inspiring artist. I found his series titled “The Dreamers” to be particularly interesting as he made great use of slow motion (high speed) shooting of subjects underwater which produced images that almost made the subjects look as though they had drowned, yet there was still a small element of life remaining.

I very much liked the use of Plasma Screens in a portrait orientation to present the works too, and with the piped underwater sounds it was a very inspiring, maybe I’ll have to look at doing some portrait work of my own.

The shoot itself proved quite a challenge as the bright plasma screens were placed in almost totally dark rooms and having any additional lighting present would have effected the way the artist wanted to present the works. Fast lenses like the Canon 24mm 1.4 and 50 1.2 were a big help and then relatively clean image at higher ISO ranges on the C300 and C100 came in very useful!

The video was also shot in Canon Log to give as much dynamic range as possible but for some reason the producers decided not to grade it at all during the edit so it still looks very flat.